Old Age and Prosocial Behavior: Social Preferences or Experimental Confounds? [Dataset] (ICPSR doi:10.11588/data/10067)

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Document Description

Citation

Title:

Old Age and Prosocial Behavior: Social Preferences or Experimental Confounds? [Dataset]

Identification Number:

doi:10.11588/data/10067

Distributor:

heiDATA

Date of Distribution:

2016-02-03

Version:

1

Bibliographic Citation:

Kettner, Sara Elisa; Waichman, Israel, 2016, "Old Age and Prosocial Behavior: Social Preferences or Experimental Confounds? [Dataset]", https://doi.org/10.11588/data/10067, heiDATA, V1

Study Description

Citation

Title:

Old Age and Prosocial Behavior: Social Preferences or Experimental Confounds? [Dataset]

Identification Number:

doi:10.11588/data/10067

Authoring Entity:

Kettner, Sara Elisa (Alfred-Weber-Institute of Economics)

Waichman, Israel (Alfred-Weber-Institute of Economics)

Producer:

Kettner, Sara Elisa

Waichman, Israel

Distributor:

heiDATA

Date of Distribution:

2016-02-03

Study Scope

Keywords:

Social Sciences, social preferences, participant pool, dictator game, age, experimenter demand effect, hypothetical bias

Topic Classification:

C91, D64

Abstract:

Experimental and field evidence indicate a positive link between social preferences and age, most strikingly between the elderly and young adults. However, it is possible that the seemingly positive link between age and preferences stems from confounds in experimental procedure. In a dictator game study we find that elderly participants do indeed transfer higher shares of their endowments to their peers than a standard sample of student participants. This result holds good even in treatments accounting for wealth differences and experimenter demand effects. However, we observe no difference in behavior when we compare elderly participants and students who have not previously participated in economic experiments. Accordingly, it is possible that the seemingly stronger social preferences of the elderly are due to confounds associated with lack of experience with economic experiments. In addition, when comparing incentivized and hypothetical transfer decisions, we observe a hypothetical bias in treatments with a "take" framing, but not in treatments with the standard "give" framing.

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Final_Dataset_Kettner&Waichman.xlsx

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Index_Dataset_Final.pdf

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Translation of Instructions_Incentivized_take_5EURO.pdf

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